SAN FRANCISCO SPCA PARTNERS WITH SFMOMA FOR PET PORTRAITS DAY TO CELEBRATE THE JOAN BROWN RETROSPECTIVE

SAN FRANCISCO (February 2, 2022)— The San Francisco SPCA partners with the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) for Pet Portraits Day, an exciting live art extravaganza, to celebrate the Joan Brown retrospective. Joan Brown was known for her enduring love of animals, and her art features many depictions of cats and dogs (many of them her own pets), featured throughout the exhibition. With this inspiration in mind, guests are invited to share a digital photo of their pet for the chance to receive a complimentary, original pet portrait made by a local artist. SF SPCA’s Animal Assisted Therapy Team will make a special appearance at SFMOMA for Pet Portraits Day.

Everyone is invited to watch the art-making experience unfold. Some 50 Bay Area artists — plus participating kids ages 4 and up, working with SFMOMA Family Programs — will create portraits in a variety of mediums, from acrylic, watercolor, and gouache to pen-and-ink, collage, and clay. A selection of finished portraits will be displayed in the museum’s Gina and Stuart Peterson White Box on Floor 4 and will stay on view through February 6. Those whose pet photo is selected for a portrait will receive their artwork in the mail in the weeks following the event. Additional information is available here.

“The SF SPCA is a local nonprofit that relies on community support,” said Lisa Feder, SF SPCA Chief of Rescue and Welfare. “As the SF SPCA celebrates our 155th anniversary throughout the year, this partnership with SFMOMA is a special opportunity for us to connect with pet lovers from across the Bay Area, raise awareness, and share the importance of our lifesaving work.”

“On the occasion of our Joan Brown exhibition, SFMOMA is thrilled to partner with the SF SPCA to present this live art event celebrating our shared love of pets,” added Tomoko Kanamitsu, SFMOMA’s Barbara and Stephan Vermut Director of Public Engagement.

The SF SPCA kicked off its 155th anniversary celebration on January 28 with a special adoption event and will continue to celebrate throughout 2023 with special events, its annual gala, and the inaugural SF SPCA Awards. 

 

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About the San Francisco SPCA

The San Francisco SPCA is an independent, community-supported, nonprofit animal welfare organization dedicated to saving, protecting and providing immediate care for cats and dogs who are homeless, ill or in need of an advocate. The SF SPCA also works long-term to educate the community, reduce the number of unwanted kittens and puppies through spaying and neutering, and improve the quality of life for animals and their human companions. The organization does not receive government funding. For more information, visit sfspca.org.

SAN FRANCISCO SPCA ANNOUNCES INAUGURAL AWARDS PROGRAM TO CELEBRATE PET-FRIENDLY DESTINATIONS THROUGHOUT THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA

Introduced as part of its 155th anniversary, the SF SPCA Awards will recognize pet-friendly restaurants, bars, hotels, fitness locations, retail, offices, and more!

San Francisco, January 30, 2023—San Francisco SPCA announced its inaugural awards program to celebrate pet-friendly destinations throughout the San Francisco Bay Area. The SF SPCA introduced the new SF SPCA Awards on Saturday, January 28 at Be Mine Furever, a Community Open House and Adoption Event that kicked off the organization’s 155th anniversary celebrations. Sourced in part by local pet guardians and animal lovers, the SF SPCA Awards will recognize pet-friendly restaurants, bars, hotels, fitness locations, retail, offices, and more.

Winners will be determined through a nomination process available now, online at sfspca.org/awards. Submissions will be accepted through February 28, 2023. The winners will be announced on the SF SPCA’s 155th anniversary on April 18, 2023.

“We look forward to recognizing all of the wonderful corners of the Bay Area that help improve and celebrate the well-being of pets and their owners,” said Dr. Jennifer Scarlett, SF SPCA CEO. “There are countless local businesses that love animals as much as we do, and locales that are favorites among our furry friends. With the SF SPCA Awards, more pet guardians will be able to learn about these resources.”

Winners of the 2023 SF SPCA Awards will receive a special SF SPCA Award Winner designation for their location and will be recognized throughout the SF SPCA’s 155th-anniversary celebrations.

 

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About the San Francisco SPCA

The San Francisco SPCA is an independent, community-supported, nonprofit animal welfare organization dedicated to saving, protecting, and providing immediate care for cats and dogs who are homeless, ill or in need of an advocate. The SF SPCA also works long-term to educate the community, reduce the number of unwanted kittens and puppies through spaying and neutering, and improve the quality of life for animals and their human companions. The organization does not receive government funding. For more information, visit sfspca.org.

SUFFERING, EUTHANASIA INCREASE AS ANIMAL SHELTERS STRUGGLE TO COPE WITH STATEWIDE VETERINARY SHORTAGE 

Hundreds of thousands of animals impacted, and euthanasia expected to rise without immediate action  

San Francisco, January 31, 2023—More than 344,000 California shelter animals do not have adequate access to veterinary care staff, according to a recent survey that highlights how veterinarian shortages are profoundly impacting California’s most vulnerable animals. As a result, shelters are becoming overcrowded, illness is rising, and adoptable animals are being euthanized.  

Of the shelters that have budgeted positions for veterinarians and veterinary nurses, more than 50% of those positions remain vacant due to a lack of candidates, leaving 25% of shelters unable to provide essential veterinary care. The survey also noted that 64% of shelters cannot provide care for basic medical needs such as treating common viral infection parvovirus, performing diagnostics like bloodwork and X-rays, and performing surgeries, including spay/neuter. Furthermore, 68% cannot consistently provide complete care to treat conditions commonly seen in shelters, such as fractures, eye injuries, and dental problems.  

“This survey lays bare the tremendous hardships facing California’s most vulnerable pets and adds even more urgency to addressing our state’s debilitating veterinary shortage,” said Dr. Jennifer Scarlett, CEO of the SF SPCA. “Inequitable access to veterinary care is the greatest threat to companion-animal welfare of our generation. Unless we take immediate steps to mitigate the suffering through a combination of policy and support of veterinary professionals, these issues will only worsen, and animals will be the real victims.”  

According to the survey, veterinary-care shortages have already led to an increase in the euthanasia of healthy and treatable animals at more than a third of California shelters. Moreover, 40% of animal shelters cannot provide consistent access to spay/neuter services, which are required in California before animals can be adopted. 

Many shelters provide critical support to their communities through low-cost spay/neuter and other surrender-prevention resources. The survey showed that 78% of shelters are unable to consistently provide these services. The impacts compound themselves in a reinforcing downward cycle. For example, if spay/neuter services cannot be offered to the community, this can lead to more “unwanted” animals surrendered to the shelter. 

“The lack of veterinarians in California is having a devastating effect on our state’s most vulnerable animals,” said State Senator Dave Cortese. “We are seeing increases in diseases and even euthanasia services to our pets simply because we do not have the capacity to care for them. Unless we make significant changes soon to how we support our veterinarians and medical staff, more animals will continue to suffer needlessly.” 

The survey was conducted by the SF SPCA in partnership with the UC-Davis Koret Shelter Medicine Program, CalAnimals, University of Tennessee Pet Health Equity Program, Humane Society of Silicon Valley, and San Diego Humane Society. It was made possible through a California for All Animals grant from the UC-Davis Koret Shelter Medicine Program.  

Nearly 80% of respondents said that an increased length of stay in animal shelters results from inadequate access to vet care. This raises the costs to house animals, strongly contributes to behavioral deterioration, and increases the number of animals that the shelter staff need to care for at any given time.  

“These staffing shortages are not only endangering the health and well-being of our animals, they are having increasingly detrimental effects on workers throughout the industry,” said Kate Hurley, Program Director of the UC Davis Koret Shelter Medicine Program. “Staff are overwhelmed because of the sheer volume of animals in their care, and that anxiety is heightened by the inability to provide the level of veterinary care staff know the animals deserve. Shelters are in desperate need of assistance to resolve the situation both in the immediate and long-term. This industry is in a time of crisis right now.” 

Homeless animals need your support. Consider reaching out to your local and state representatives to encourage them to take action on this matter. You can also help by adopting, volunteering, and supporting your local animal shelter.  

The SF SPCA, advocates, and fellow shelters are working to partner with oversight agencies for solutions. 

The full survey results can be found at sfspca.org/survey 

 

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About the San Francisco SPCA  

The San Francisco SPCA is an independent, community-supported nonprofit animal welfare organization dedicated to saving, protecting, and providing immediate care for cats and dogs who are homeless, ill, or in need of an advocate. The SF SPCA also works long-term to educate the community, reduce the number of unwanted kittens and puppies through spaying and neutering, and improve the quality of life for animals and their human companions. The organization does not receive government funding.  

 

For more information, visit sfspca.org 

The airline donated $5,000 to the SF SPCA at a celebratory adoption party for Polaris the dog and his new family at SFO.  

SAN FRANCISCO (December 16, 2022)— San Francisco SPCA and United Airlines partnered to give a new, loving home and family to Polaris the dog after he was abandoned at San Francisco International Airport (SFO) earlier this fall. Through the partnership, Polaris found a forever home with United Captain William Dale and his family. On December 15, United hosted a celebratory adoption party at SFO and donated $5,000 to the SF SPCA to support their year-round lifesaving work helping animals who are ill, injured, homeless, or in need of an advocate. 

“United’s Customer Service team took on quite a challenge to ensure Polaris would be safe, healthy, and find a loving home,” said Lisa Feder, SF SPCA Chief of Rescue and Welfare. “We were honored that United called the SF SPCA to facilitate this adoption because of our knowledge and expertise in adoptions, as well as nearly 155 years of offering care and protection to pets. We’re grateful that we can celebrate with them today, and for their $5,000 donation that will help to save lives year-round.” 

The dog arrived with a traveler at SFO from an international destination where the customer chose to continue traveling on without his animal. United worked to ensure the puppy completed necessary requirements to enter the United States, including a quarantine period.  

“From the moment Polaris landed in our care, our entire SFO United team cared for him 24/7 until we were able to get permission to keep him safely in the U.S.,” said Vincent Passafiume, Director of Customer Service at United. “It’s a great feeling to see this story come full circle and that Polaris will have a loving home with United Airlines Captain Dale and his family—just in time for the holidays.” 

During the holiday season, the SF SPCA is making it easier for anyone to give a lucky pet a new home with FREE adoptions for all adult dogs (5+ months old) through December 31 and get 50% off the puppy adoption fee by completing their online Puppy Parent Orientation course. View adoptable animals at sfspca.org/adopt. 

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About the San Francisco SPCA 

The San Francisco SPCA is an independent, community-supported, nonprofit animal welfare organization dedicated to saving, protecting and providing immediate care for cats and dogs who are homeless, ill or in need of an advocate. The SF SPCA also works long-term to educate the community, reduce the number of unwanted kittens and puppies through spaying and neutering, and improve the quality of life for animals and their human companions. The organization does not receive government funding. 

MEDIA CONTACT:  

SF SPCA: Julie Richter | julie@julierichter.co | 480.818.8022 

United Airlines: Maddie King | Maddie.king@united.com 

For the first time since 2019, visitors will see a selection of adorable, adoptable cats and dogs in Macy’s Holiday Windows from November 18, 2022 – January 1, 2023.

SAN FRANCISCO (November 7, 2022)— Today, the San Francisco SPCA and Macy’s Union Square announced the return of live rescue animals to its 36th annual Holiday Windows, available for viewing from November 18, 2022, through January 1, 2023. For the first time since 2019, adorable cats and dogs—all available for adoption through the SF SPCA—will delight shoppers and passersby on Thursdays through Sundays from 12-5 p.m. To celebrate the partnership, Macy’s has donated $5,000 to the SF SPCA to support their year-round lifesaving work helping animals who are ill, injured, homeless or in need of an advocate.

“We are thrilled to bring live animals back to Macy’s Union Square for the 36th annual Holiday Windows,” said Dr. Jennifer Scarlett, SF SPCA CEO. “This favorite tradition not only brings joy to holiday shoppers, but more importantly, it has helped more than 10,000 animals find loving homes. This ongoing partnership with Macy’s and their $5,000 donation will help to save lives year-round.”

The Holiday Windows at Macy’s Union Square will provide a preview of the many pets available for adoption this holiday season through the SF SPCA. Those looking for a new best friend can view adoptable animals at sfspca.org/adopt.

In order to serve pets year-round, donation drop-offs will be placed on the 8th floor in Macy’s Backstage, accepting new, unwrapped essential supplies for pets and their owners. Guests can donate supplies such as towels, cat and dog toys and more. Alongside the live cats and dogs, shoppers will also be able to view videos in the Macy’s Holiday Windows—both live streams from the SF SPCA’s adoption center as well as videos of SF SPCA shelter alumni. Santa will make special appearances on the live streams, which will be available for viewing online at sfspca.org/holiday

“Macy’s Union Square is excited to continue this beloved tradition, which has brought generations of San Franciscans joy and helped thousands of animals find their forever homes,” said John Sparks, Macy’s Union Square store manager. “We are thankful for our long-standing partnership with the San Francisco SPCA and look forward to sharing the season of joy with customers as they continue the tradition of visiting these adorable animals in our Holiday Windows as part of their holiday shopping experience.”

The SF SPCA’s Animal Assisted Therapy team will also bring their specially trained therapy animals to Macy’s Union Square this holiday season. Shoppers will be able to interact with the animals, whose surprise visits are meant to bring a little extra holiday cheer to Macy’s Union Square.

SF SPCA is grateful for the support of sponsors, including the Nestle Purina PetCare Company. To learn more about these experiences and donate to support the SF SPCA’s lifesaving programs, visit sfspca.org/holiday.

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About the San Francisco SPCA

The San Francisco SPCA is an independent, community-supported, nonprofit animal welfare organization dedicated to saving, protecting, and providing immediate care for cats and dogs who are homeless, ill, or in need of an advocate. The SF SPCA also works long-term to educate the community, reduce the number of unwanted kittens and puppies through spaying and neutering, and improve the quality of life for animals and their human companions. The organization does not receive government funding.

For more information, visit sfspca.org.

About Macy’s

Macy’s, the largest retail brand of Macy’s, Inc., serves as the style source for generations of customers. With one of the nation’s largest e-commerce platforms powered by macys.com and mobile app, paired with a nationwide network of stores, Macy’s delivers the most convenient and seamless shopping experience, offering great values in apparel, home, beauty, accessories, and more. Macy’s gives customers even more ways to shop and own their style through an off-price assortment at Macy’s Backstage and at our highly curated and smaller store format, Market by Macy’s. Each year, Macy’s provides millions with unforgettable experiences through Macy’s 4th of July Fireworks® and Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade® and helps our customers celebrate special moments, big and small. We’re guided by our purpose—to create a brighter future with bold representation—that empowers more voice, choice, and ownership for our colleagues, customers, and communities.

About Nestle Purina PetCare Company

Many thanks to our longtime supporter, Nestle Purina PetCare Company. Purina believes pets and people are better together, which is why they support events like Holiday Windows. Purina supports the SF SPCA’s mission to put pets and the people who love them together every day. Purina generously donates all of the food and litter for the SF SPCA shelter animals who are waiting for loving people like you to take them home. Meow, woof, thank you, Purina!

Oct. 27, 2022 — The San Francisco Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SF SCPA) is offering a three-month paid Community Medicine Education Training (CoMET) program. In partnership with Young Community Developers (YCD), this program is designed to reduce the barriers to entry for the animal well-being field while also supporting the SF SPCA’s broader efforts to engage and support communities historically underrepresented in the veterinary field.

CoMET provides an opportunity for individuals to learn about the field, professional paths and opportunities, and develop essential skills by participating in lectures, workshops and assisting at SF SPCA’s various clinics (Community Veterinary Clinic, Mobile Vaccine Clinic and Spay/Neuter Clinic). Upon completion of the program, participants will have broad, introductory experience for work in a variety of roles in animal welfare, receive a certificate, and can apply to be considered for a full-time position at the SF SPCA. There will be two trainees in each CoMET cohort.

According to a 2020 report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, roughly 92% of veterinarians and veterinary technicians and 74% of animal shelter workers are white. A more diverse veterinary workforce is necessary to keep pace with an increasingly diverse society, and by removing barriers and creating inclusive work environments, we can improve access and quality of veterinary care.

Maddie’s Fund®, a national family foundation established by Dave and Cheryl Duffield to revolutionize the status and well-being of companion animals, is providing $300,000 in funding over three years for CoMET.

“We are incredibly grateful to Maddie’s Fund for their generous grant in support of our Community Medicine Education Training program,” said Dr. Jennifer Scarlett, SF SPCA Chief Executive Officer. “Thanks to Maddie, this support will help make veterinary medicine more accessible to those who have been traditionally underrepresented in the field. We are honored to partner with Maddie’s Fund in making animal welfare more inclusive.”

“Maddie’s Fund is proud of our long history of support for the San Francisco SPCA,” said Mary Ippolitti-Smith, Executive Leadership Team, Maddie’s Fund. “CoMET exemplifies how we can co-create meaningful and authentic partnerships with community, with the potential to not only impact CoMET graduates but the entire animal well-being field. CoMET continues the SF SPCA’s legacy of innovation as the team continues to find new ways to improve and change the work we do on behalf of the people and pets in our community.”

CoMET comes at a time when the nation is facing a severe veterinary staffing shortage that is only predicted to worsen in the coming years. Helping develop skilled professionals in the veterinary field will increase the SF SPCA’s capacity to serve our community of animals and their humans.

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About San Francisco SPCA 

The San Francisco SPCA is an independent, community-supported nonprofit animal welfare organization dedicated to saving, protecting, and providing immediate care for cats and dogs who are homeless, ill, or in need of an advocate. The SF SPCA also works long-term to educate the community, reduce the number of unwanted kittens and puppies through spaying and neutering, and improve the quality of life for animals and their human companions. The organization does not receive government funding.

For more information, visit sfspca.org.

About Maddie’s Fund 

Maddie’s Fund® is a family foundation established in 1994 by Dave and Cheryl Duffield and is the fulfillment of a promise to their inspirational dog, Maddie. She provided them much joy for over ten years and continues to inspire them today.

The Foundation has awarded over $265 million in grants toward increased community collaborations and live outcomes, pioneering shelter medicine education and establishing foster care as a standard across the U.S.

Maddie’s Fund proudly offers the industry a national voice, important funding opportunities for bold ideas, learning resources and access to collaborate and share innovative solutions. The Foundation invests its resources in a commitment to keeping pets and people together, creating a safety net of care for animals in need and operating within a culture of inclusiveness and humility. #ThanksToMaddie.

Innovative new model provides low-cost services and increase access to care in community with very limited veterinary services

San Francisco, October 20, 2022 — San Francisco SPCA, elected officials, community leaders, and pet guardians are celebrating the opening of the organization’s new community veterinary clinic, an innovative low-cost model in the Excelsior District that will address access to care issues in the City’s southern neighborhoods.

Currently, there are very limited veterinary services in the Excelsior and opening a clinic helps under-resourced families access treatment and care for their dogs and cats. By shifting focus to the Excelsior District, the SF SPCA will redouble its commitment to providing veterinary care for the city’s most underserved pets.

“We believe that all animals deserve access to veterinary care,” said Dr. Jennifer Scarlett, CEO of the SF SPCA. “By offering a fixed menu of services at a lower cost, this clinic will help prevent small issues from becoming larger ones that require more expensive treatments. The new clinic will prevent unnecessary illness and suffering, while helping keep pets out of shelters and in the loving homes of neighborhood families. We are excited to partner with the Excelsior community on this great project, and we’re so grateful for the community input that helped shape this clinic.”

The new clinic location, 4527 Mission Street, was chosen based on the organization’s experience working in the neighborhood for the past 10 years, including hosting a monthly free vaccine clinic in nearby Visitacion Valley. To ensure the clinic is truly a resource for the local community, the SF SPCA also partnered with a community-based consulting group to conduct focus groups. The clinic’s location is near several transportation hubs, allowing easy access for those who need it. The SF SPCA also examined best practices from other organizations that provide similar services in other parts of the country.

The first of its kind in San Francisco, the clinic offers a fixed menu of services that cover most veterinary needs—aside from urgent care and more involved diagnostics—allowing for more animals to be seen at a lower price point. The clinic offers services like examinations, vaccinations, treatment for skin and ear problems, and flea and tick prevention. The low-cost preventative model focuses on high-quality incremental care, with clear up-front communication about the costs and options available. No emergency services are available at this location.

“There is a desperate need for affordable veterinary care at the moment,” said Dr. Scarlett. “We believe this innovative model can address that issue while serving as a model for future veterinary clinics across the region.”

The community clinic is an expansion of the Walk-In Wellness Clinic that the SF SPCA piloted at its Mission Campus for three years. The success of that endeavor helped encourage the organization to build upon its offering and relocate it to an area that is more accessible to traditionally under-resourced communities.

The SF SPCA will continue to offer high-quality veterinary services at the organization’s Mission hospital at 201 Alabama Street. At that location, the SF SPCA both serves the public and provides medical care for the thousands of homeless animals who enter its shelter each year – many of which would not get care elsewhere.

The SF SPCA is also working to address the nationwide veterinary shortage through its advocacy work, partnerships with shelters throughout the state, and through a new training program for veterinary assistants, CoMET (Community Medicine Education Training Program). CoMET provides an opportunity for historically underrepresented individuals to learn and develop essential skills needed to succeed in the veterinary field. The first two CoMET graduates, who are from the City’s southern neighborhoods, are now working at the SF SPCA’s Community Veterinary Clinic.

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About the San Francisco SPCA

The San Francisco SPCA is an independent, community-supported nonprofit animal welfare organization dedicated to saving, protecting, and providing immediate care for cats and dogs who are homeless, ill, or in need of an advocate. The SF SPCA also works long-term to educate the community, reduce the number of unwanted kittens and puppies through spaying and neutering, and improve the quality of life for animals and their human companions. The organization does not receive government funding.

For more information, visit sfspca.org

Prop 26 Provides a Financial “Lifeline” to the Horseracing Industry with a Terrible Animal Safety Record

SACRAMENTO, CA – August 4, 2022 – Organizations across the state dedicated to the humane treatment of animals have come together to announce their opposition to Proposition 26 which will be on the November 2022 ballot. Prop 26 contains a provision that allows in-person sports betting at private horse racetracks in addition to tribal casinos. This amounts to a special interest giveaway that hands millions of dollars to horse racetracks – a dying industry that has led to the death of more than 1,600 horses over the last 10 years.

“Prop 26 will give millions of dollars to an industry that has a terrible record on animal safety with horses dying every year,” said Madeline Bernstein, President of spcaLA. “This industry has been failing and attendance declining over the last few years – even before the pandemic – and we should not give them a bailout. The people have already ‘voted’.”

“Prop 26 provides a financial ‘shot in the arm’ to private horseracing tracks with no requirement or accountability towards increasing animal safety,” said Jill Tucker, CEO of California Animal Welfare Association. “This is not good policy as the industry needs to independently improve animal safety to attract back its customer base rather than ignoring these serious challenges and focusing on millions of dollars coming their way due to Prop 26.”

“We are seriously concerned about Proposition 26 as it ignores the animal safety record and instead gives the horseracing industry a new funding stream in the form of millions of dollars,” said Dr. Gary Weitzman, President and CEO at San Diego Humane Society. “We encourage voters to reject Prop 26.”

“Horse racing amounts to animal cruelty and exploitation,” said Dr. Jennifer Scarlett, CEO of San Francisco SPCA. “It is a dying industry that should not be given millions of dollars in aid through in person sports wagering. If Prop 26 passes, countless horses will suffer in the coming years. For this reason, we strongly oppose Prop 26.”

California horseracing tracks reported 144 horse deaths in 2018 as well as reporting 122 horse deaths from July 2019-June 2020 and 72 horse deaths during the height of the pandemic from July 2020-June 2021. In fact, a nationally-recognized horse racing expert stated in a January 2022 Daily Californian opinion article, “From breeding for speed, to employing pubescent bodies, to the incessant grinding – not to mention the commodification – of those bodies, to forcing them to run at an unnatural rate, in an unnatural way, and through unnatural means, horse racing guarantees killing. Guarantees.Source

Santa Anita has already experienced another eight horse deaths in the past six months while the horse racing industry is touting Prop 26 as its “lifeline” stating:

USA Today headline last week proclaimed “How legalized sports betting in California could revive horse tracks” and the article discusses how Prop 26 will help a dying industry. One owner of 76 race horses said, “The addition of this wagering could be monumental for horse racing, a major shot in the arm.”

“It’s going to be very powerful” for the racing industry. Horse racing is never going to get monies from the state or from the casinos. This is our last lifeline, and it’s extremely important to us.” – Thoroughbred Owners of California (TOC) vice chairman, Bob Liewald, Thoroughbred Daily News

Due to this handout to horse racetracks, organizations today announcing their opposition to Proposition 26 include:

● California Animal Welfare Association
● Forgotten Felines of Sonoma County
● Fresno Humane Animal Services
● Inland Valley Humane Society and S.P.C.A.
● Marin Humane Society
● National Animal Care and Control Association
● Public Interest Coalition
● San Diego Humane Society
● Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Los Angeles (spcaLA)
● San Francisco Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (San Francisco SPCA)

If enacted, Prop 26 will propagate the horse racing industry by allowing horse racetracks to accept sports wagers at their facilities and receive millions of dollars in new revenue. For years, horse racing has been declining in popularity, with attendance dramatically down at racetracks even before the COVID-19 pandemic began. Handing millions of dollars to special interest racetracks will enable them to continue operating despite their concerning animal safety record and declining popularity with Californians.

For more information on Prop 26, go to https://tasimcoalition.org/

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Barbara brings over 20 year of unique public policy expertise and extensive experience in the animal welfare industry

San Francisco, CA – July 5, 2022 – The San Francisco SPCA has announced that Barbara Schmitz, JD, will join the Shelter Policy and Legal Services (PALS) team as Advocacy Counsel starting in August 2022. Shelter PALS is the country’s first and only legal aid program dedicated exclusively to the needs of animal shelters. Shelter PALS leverages the expertise of the best minds in animal welfare, and channels significant legal aid to animal shelters. The program champions policy change and counsels shelter clients to reduce imbalances of expertise and resources that result in poor outcomes for animals.

Barbara has over 20 years of experience in public policy and advocacy on behalf of animals nationwide. Most recently, Barbara was the Staff Services Manager for the State of California. She previously served as the Director of Advocacy and Outreach for Alley Cat Allies and State Director for the Humane Society of the United States.

“Animal shelters in California are facing significant and mounting challenges; intake numbers are rising while the national veterinary staffing shortage continues to worsen,” said Dr. Jennifer Scarlett, CEO of the SF SPCA. “Barbara has the experience and policy background needed to expand Shelter PALS services and help shelters save lives.”

Barbara also has experience providing pro bono legal support to organizations such as Legal Services of Eastern Missouri’s Volunteer Lawyer Program, St. Louis Animal Rights Team, Missouri’s Humane Advocacy Network, and Missouri River Otter Protection Coalition. Barbara received her JD from the St. Louis University School of Law.

To learn more about Shelter PALS or support the SF SPCA’s advocacy efforts, visit sfspca.org/shelterpals

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About the San Francisco SPCA

The San Francisco SPCA is an independent, community-supported nonprofit animal welfare organization dedicated to saving, protecting, and providing immediate care for cats and dogs who are homeless, ill, or in need of an advocate. The SF SPCA also works long-term to educate the community, reduce the number of unwanted kittens and puppies through spaying and neutering, and improve the quality of life for animals and their human companions. The organization does not receive government funding.

For more information, visit sfspca.org

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