Scientific Studies

Numerous scientific studies have shown the harmful effects of aversive training methods and equipment. Below you’ll find some of the most important studies to date.

A survey of the use and outcome of confrontational and non-confrontational training methods in client-owned dogs showing undesired behaviors (Herron 2009).

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168159108003717

The effects of two training methods on stress-related behaviors of the dog and on the owner-dog relationship (Deldalle et al., 2013).

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1558787814000070

Training methods and owner-dog interactions; links with dog behavior and learning ability (Rooney et al., 2011).

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168159111000876

Dog training methods: their use, effectiveness and interaction with behavior and welfare (Hibey et al., 2004).

http://avsabonline.org/blog/view/dog-training-methods-their-use-effectiveness-and-interaction-with-behaviour

The use of electronic collars for training domestic dogs: estimated prevalence, reasons and risk factors for use, and owner perceived success as compared to other training methods (Blackwell et al., 2012).

http://bmcvetres.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1746-6148-8-93

Training methods of military dog handlers and their effects on the team’s performances (Haverbecke et al., 2007).

http://www.pawsoflife.org/Library/Training/Haverbeke%202%202008.pdf

The relationship between training methods and the occurrence of behavior problems, as reported by owners, in a population of domestic dogs (Blackwell et al., 2008).

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1558787807002766